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it or not. i was born in flint, michigan. i went to law school and became a lawyer and clerk for justice powell of the supreme court. was a lawyer and was planning to do that for my career in washington. was plucked to be general counsel of the parent company of abc back in 81. i did that for a few years. through a roundabout way i ended up becoming president of abc news. it's not something i ever saw to do. even when what to do it i did it because we need secession plant because we needed secession plan and his i thought i would do it for a couple of years. the biggest surprise was that came to absolutely love it. i've met some wonderful jobs. i've been very blessed, but been any news organization like abc news, much less running it is a rare privilege. that's part of the reason i wrote the book is, people have not had that experience, some sense what it is like. >> how do you get to go to the supreme court? what was that process? what did you learn at the supreme court that helped you run abc? >> as i said it went to michigan undergraduate, and sort of wandered into the law. i was fort
was elected. i think we need to chase that. host: fifth let's hear from me now from midland, michigan. caller: i think it looks pretty good. i do not know how they are going to print out all of the new tax forms by the time we go to fill out our taxes. i am a republican and a bit less than $15,000 a year. i will pick up a beer can or a beer bottle when i am going down the street. most definitely. i have to collect them some days just to get by. as far as kicking the can of the road, i believe -- i do not believe in that. i think republicans have to face the fact that the conservatives always believe in a balanced budget. they always do. they have to scale down the monstrosity of a government they have. host: a reminder to all of our callers, please keep the sound of doubt on your tv set at home. -- keep the sound down on your tv set at home. here is a short piece from the interview on why the senator is leaving office. [video clip] >> many reasons. i have served here 20 years. less than 5 percent have serve that long. some of it is i am tired of living out of a suitcase. i miss 80% of my wife
concerned about the labor moment. >> oh, yes. >> during the '30s -- >> in michigan. >> exactly. that my point. >> in the 1930s is a key, very threatening moment, and during the strikes strikes of world wad strikes -- the miner strikes and tremendous dissatisfaction right after the war in the '45-'46 period. goes all through film noir and this not convenience for the bosses and elite to look -- to deflect the tension that exists in the american life by pointing to stalin and the communists and saying, this is -- >> of course. >> this is the enemy. >> of course, the red scare was a scare against the communist party which was declining quickly, after 1948, progressive party. debacle lost, and thus the cold war. but at the same time the american right and the american corporate interests used that fear to turn people against labor, at the same time without denying that -- when the soviets -- in europe, take away democracy,. >> where is the energy? the energy is in the united states. stop these strikes. stop labor. and i think that the stalin -- always been a convenient distraction for the r
pro tempore: the gentlewoman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from michigan, mr. curson, for five minutes. mr. curson: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for five minutes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. curson: thank you. my thanks to the chair. today i rise to recognize mrs. carolyn coleman, executive secretary to the secretary treasurer of the international union u.a.w., on her retirement. as a member of congress, it is both my privilege and honor to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayh
was pulling miserably. even in michigan, people did not want to intervene to save the auto industry. he had a lengthy meeting with the odd note team -- with the auto team. i reported on the pulling and he said, look, i completely understand what people feel that way. but if we don't do anything, we will lose an iconic american institution and a million jobs will go with it in the midst of the worst recession since the great depression. so we need to get them to rationalize the industry can get them to make cars for the 21st century. we have to make that shot. and he did. i think the results are clear now. on health care, i can categorically report you that there was not anybody who was telling him that taking on health care was a good political issue. we knew even in the campaign, in the general election of 2008, what a difficult issue was. we took the offensive on it. the president said we have been trying to solve this problem for 60 years. if we do not do it in the first two years, it will never get done. we're not here to husband their popularity and admire it on the shelf. we're here t
direction? mr. durbin: in response to the senator from michigan, the republican senate leader, senator mcconnell, has such a strong appetite for the filibuster that we have seen 386 or 387 filibusters in the last six years, and now he has decided another good idea is to propose a bill and then filibuster your own bill. i do believe that's history in the making, but that's why this appetite for the filibuster in the senate has to change. what an abuse that we can't have a majority vote on something the republicans proposed and the democrats were prepared to vote for. this would have been a true bipartisan measure. good news, maybe lead the news across america. it really is unfortunate. mr. schumer: would the minority leader yield? mr. reid: madam president? i have some business here. you will get the floor right back. madam president, i now move to proceed to calendar number 554, s. 3637. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: motion to proceed to the consideration of calendar number 554, s. 3637, a bill to temporarily extend the transaction account guarantee p
pennsylvania, michigan, or minnesota, that i would shave my mustache off. he agreed he would grow one if we want florida or north carolina. of course i one of the bet. joe negotiated his way out by saying he will give us $10,000 -- they have been great supporters of hours -- and they would do a fund-raiser for us and we're a fake moustache of our choosing. we then said, if we could raise $1 million by the end of this month for epilepsy research, for a cure, i would still shave off my moustache on "morning joe." this is the final week. we have raised close to $900,000. there is still time. anybody who wants to log on to slashthestache.com can contribute. [applause] >> i know i speak on behalf of everyone when i say we look forward to seeing much more of you on campus. thanks so much for everything. >> thank you. i am so excited to be here. i think this is going to be an extraordinary institute. students are going to benefit from it. the community will benefit from it. we'll make university of chicago a real destination for the newsmakers, for practitioner in politics. it will be a great addi
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7